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Frequently Asked Questions

If your question is not among these common items, please feel free to contact us at juniorskeptic@skeptic.com.

What is Junior Skeptic?
Junior Skeptic is the 10-page kids’ science section bound into Skeptic magazine.
Who created Junior Skeptic?
Junior Skeptic was created by Skeptic co-publisher and Art Director Pat Linse.
Where can I get Junior Skeptic?
Junior Skeptic is found within Skeptic magazine. Skeptic is available by subscription, or at major newsstands. Subscribe today.
Who is the intended audience for Junior Skeptic?
Junior Skeptic is intended to serve two audiences: adult readers of Skeptic (who often say they turn straight to Junior Skeptic “like reading the comics first”), and kids with roughly a Grade 6–8 reading level. (Junior Skeptic Editor Daniel Loxton describes the intended audience as “Myself in Grade 7: bright kids who enjoy reading and have an interest in mysteries.”)
What sorts of material does Junior Skeptic cover?
Junior Skeptic typically tackles classic paranormal topics like Bigfoot, ESP, or the Bermuda Triangle. In addition to these things that go bump in the night, some issues concentrate on straight science topics like evolution.
What is Junior Skeptic’s position on God or religion?
Junior Skeptic has no position for or against God or religion. Instead, Junior Skeptic concentrates on accurately describing the findings of science and history — including the robust evidence for biological evolution — while leaving religious discussions to families and communities.
What is Junior Skeptic’s position on Santa Claus?
Junior Skeptic has no position on Santa Claus. (The personal feeling of Junior Skeptic Editor Daniel Loxton is that “Santa is a wonderful bit of childhood magic best left to parents.”)
Does Junior Skeptic contain material that may concern me as a parent?
Junior Skeptic is very clean and broadly accessible. We take special care to avoid graphic depictions of violence, graphic sexual content, and profanity.

However, parents should be aware that mildly mature material does infrequently appear within Junior Skeptic. On rare occasions, mild bad language may be found within quotations. Some paranormal claims or historical facts discussed in Junior Skeptic may be disturbing for very young children (such as alien abductions, plane crashes, or supernatural curses). Finally, some Junior Skeptic illustrations may depict realistic aliens or monsters that could be frightening to very young children.

Can I contribute illustrations to Junior Skeptic?
Possibly. Illustrators interested in contributing art to Junior Skeptic on a pro bono basis may contact Junior Skeptic at juniorskeptic@skeptic.com.
My child or I found the style of Junior Skeptic too simple / too difficult. Who should I tell?
Writing for kids is challenging — especially for kids across a range of ages. Finding the right balance between thoroughness, precision, and simplicity can be difficult, and we constantly adjust our approach. Please do share your impressions or your child’s feedback with us by emailing juniorskeptic@skeptic.com.
I found a factual error in Junior Skeptic. Who should I tell?
We appreciate assistance from readers. If you find a relatively small or straightforward factual error, please contact Junior Skeptic at juniorskeptic@skeptic.com.

If you would like to raise a more substantial objection to material in Junior Skeptic, please consider sending Skeptic a formal Letter to the Editor to editorial@skeptic.com, or start an informal online conversation at the Skeptic Forum.

Did you know that cartoon character Lisa Simpson reads Junior Skeptic?
Yes! This is a proud pedigree: the real Junior Skeptic was inspired in part by Lisa Simpson’s favorite fictional magazine — which was, in turn, a reference to the real Skeptic magazine.
How can I support the Skeptics Society’s educational efforts, including Junior Skeptic?
The Skeptics Society is a member-supported 501(c)(3) non-profit organization. A tax-deductible donation can be made online, or by contacting our staff by email at office@skeptic.com or by telephone at 626.794.3119. If you would like to discuss ways to earmark a contribution for educational projects, our staff will be pleased to assist you.

Learn more about donating to the Skeptics Society >

Have you thought about producing Junior Skeptic as a standalone magazine for kids?
This remains an exciting long-range possibility. At this time, our efforts are focused on Junior Skeptic as a robust value-added section of Skeptic — and on several spin-off book projects based on Junior Skeptic material.
Have you thought about producing books based on Junior Skeptic?
Yes! We are already hard at work on several book projects based on Junior Skeptic.

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